Brian Jay Stanley suggests a way to think about social justice disputes 

July 25, 2016

Could many societal disagreements be settled by a “live and let live” approach based upon who is affected most by decisions?  It’s a thought developed by Brian Jay Stanley in a post on his Aphorisms and Paradoxes blog in which he tells how he and his wife settle disagreements by weighing their opinions about what each would feel about certain decisions and outcomes.

He writes: “I apply this principle to the issue of gay rights. Discrimination hurts gays more than equality for gays hurts their opponents. At stake for gay people are their own lives; at stake for their opponents, merely others’ lives. The effect on gays is material, direct, and daily; the effect on their opponents, abstract, remote, and occasional, concerning only the conformity of society to their moral beliefs.”

Read this short essay and see what you think about his idea of a “Laissez-Faire Morality.”

Letha Dawson Scanzoni
Letha Dawson Scanzoni is an independent scholar, writer, and editor. In 1978, she and Virginia Ramey Mollenkott wrote Is the Homosexual My Neighbor?, one of the earliest books urging evangelical Christians to rethink their views on homosexuality (updated edition, 1994, HarperOne). More recently, Letha coauthored (with social psychologist David G. Myers) What God Has Joined Together: The Christian Case for Gay Marriage (HarperOne, 2005 and 2006). Another of Letha’s most well-known books is All We’re Meant to Be: Biblical Feminism for Today, coauthored with Nancy A. Hardesty (Word Books, 1974; revised edition, Abingdon, 1986; updated and expanded edition, Eerdmans, 1992).

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