Christians should apologize for causing pain in Christ’s name

 Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Can Christianity Learn to Say, “I’m Sorry”?
In an article for Red Letter Christians,  Stephen Mattson writes: “As children we’re taught to apologize for lying, stealing, hitting our little brother, budging in line, cheating on a test, and swearing (among other things). Most people with common decency apologize to each other for these trivial wrongdoings, but when it comes to spiritual things—especially on a widespread and corporate level—Christians rarely apologize to people beyond their faith.”  And yet throughout history, many of those who have claimed to be representatives of Christianity have caused much harm. “Millions watch as Christians spew hateful things in the name of Christ, and fellow believers are often painfully silent,” writes Mattson. “We’ve been silent for too long.”

Letha Dawson Scanzoni
Letha Dawson Scanzoni is an independent scholar, writer, and editor. In 1978, she and Virginia Ramey Mollenkott wrote Is the Homosexual My Neighbor?, one of the earliest books urging evangelical Christians to rethink their views on homosexuality (updated edition, 1994, HarperOne). More recently, Letha coauthored (with social psychologist David G. Myers) What God Has Joined Together: The Christian Case for Gay Marriage (HarperOne, 2005 and 2006). Another of Letha’s most well-known books is All We’re Meant to Be: Biblical Feminism for Today, coauthored with Nancy A. Hardesty (Word Books, 1974; revised edition, Abingdon, 1986; updated and expanded edition, Eerdmans, 1992).

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